Quick Links

Quick Links

Greenlands Primary

Art

At Greenlands all children, including SEND and disadvantaged, learn a variety of concepts and themes through studying a variety of aspects of art.

Every human is an artist

- Don Miguel Ruiz

Why art is important

Through art children have an excellent opportunity to communicate their inner thoughts and feelings through a range of media. Research suggests that art develops creativity, a core pre-requisite of innovative mind sets, communicative attitudes and problem solving; it seems obvious that the skill of ‘creating’ is fundamental to the development of solutions. Furthermore, the teaching and learning of art has been proven to have a positive impact on handwriting, social skills and overall well-being.

National Curriculum Purpose of Study

Art, craft and design embody some of the highest forms of human creativity.  A high quality art and design education should engage, inspire and challenge pupils, equipping them with the knowledge and skills to experiment, invent and create their own works of art, craft and design.  As pupils progress, they should be able to think critically and develop a more rigorous understanding of art and design.  They should also know how art and design both reflect and shape our history and contribute to the culture, creativity and wealth of our nation.

Concepts Running Through Art

  • Change - Subject matter, Form, Materials
  • Power - Impacts, influences and perceptions
  • Diversity - Ideas, contrasting points of view, styles, techniques and appreciation
  • Comparison - Different artists, techniques, representations
  • Significance - Artists, artwork, periods of time

Subject Specific Themes

  • Artists
  • Exploring
  • Evaluating
  • Drawing
  • Painting
  • Sculpting
  • Photography

Early Years Foundation Stage

Expressive arts and design is one of the seven areas of the early year’s foundation stage and at Greenlands’ art is used to develop children’s imagination, creativity and their ability to use media and materials.  Children explore a wide variety of media and tools, including; paint, pencil, play dough, brushes and natural items. It provides visual, tactile and sensory experiences and a special way of understanding and responding to the world. It enables children of all abilities to communicate what they see, feel and think through the use of colour, texture, form, pattern and different materials and processes. All these approaches to expressive arts help children to represent and understand their own feelings and ideas.

Key Stage One

The principle focus of art teaching in KS1 is to enable children to:

  • use a range of materials creatively to design and make products
  • use drawing, painting and sculpture to develop and share their ideas, experiences and imagination
  • develop a wide range of art and design techniques in using colour, pattern, texture, line, shape, form and space
  • know about the work of a range of artists, craft makers and designers, describing the differences and similarities between different practices and disciplines, and making links to their own work.

 

In year 1, children explore and compare the disciplines of drawing, painting and sculpture. They investigate a significant artist for each, , and explore significant pieces of their art work. They continue to build on the skills and knowledge that were acquired in EYFS and develop techniques to show texture when drawing and painting. They use malleable materials when sculpting, explore a range of manipulating techniques and are encouraged to discuss why these techniques have been used.

 

In year 2, children explore and compare the disciplines of drawing, painting and sculpture. They investigate a significant artist for each, and explore significant pieces of their art work. They develop their skills and knowledge by learning how to use hatching and cross hatching and how to create tints and shades.  They experiment with different brushes, different brushstrokes, and other painting tools.  Children use a variety of natural materials to create a sculpture and they are encouraged to discuss the reasoning behind their choice and combinations of materials.

Key Stage Two

 

In KS2 pupils should develop their techniques, including their control and their use of materials, with creativity, experimentation and an increasing awareness of different kinds of art, craft and design.

 

The principle focus of art teaching in KS2 is to enable children to:

  • create sketch books to record their observations and use them to review and revisit ideas
  • improve their mastery of art and design techniques, including drawing, painting and sculpture with a range of materials
  • know about great artists, architects and designers in history.:

 

In year 3, children explore and compare the disciplines of drawing, painting and sculpture. They investigate a significant artist for each, and explore significant pieces of their art work. They build on their skills and knowledge from KS1 by using random hatching, experimenting with different types of line to create a composition and colour washing. Children expand their sculpting skills from year 1 when they model clay, use tools to add texture and pattern and learn how to use a slip to join pieces of clay.

 

In year 4, children explore and compare the disciplines of drawing, painting and photography. They investigate a significant artist for each, and explore significant pieces of their art work. They build on their skills and knowledge from year 3 by using contour hatching, different grades of pencils, and experimenting with rubbings to create texture. They explore the relationship between colour and moods and competently use colour washes to build up thicker layers and paint detail. Children are introduced to photography in year 4 and become aware that photography is an art form.

 

 

In year 5, children explore and compare the disciplines of drawing, painting and sculpture. They investigate a significant artist for each, and explore significant pieces of their art work. They continue to build on their skills and knowledge from previous years by beginning to create depth in a composition through the use of very simple perspective. They use a range of paint and varied brush techniques to create shapes, textures, patterns and lines and they are able to create a background before adding detail. When sculpting they use a wire armature and Plaster of Paris.

 

 

In year 6, children explore and compare the disciplines of drawing, painting and photography. They investigate a significant artist for each, and explore significant pieces of their art work. Children expand their skills and knowledge by learning how to shade edges and outlines, and how to use perspective in drawings. They use varied brush techniques to create shapes, textures, patterns and lines and are able to create a background using a number of techniques. Children become aware that photography can capture an image of a person, place or event whilst also developing an awareness of mood, emotions, scale, perspective, movement and feelings in photography.

Overview Art teaching at Greenlands

Year

Painting

Drawing

Sculpture

Photography

 

Year 1

Alma Woodsey Thomas

Focus: Colourful Abstract

Pablo Picasso

Focus: Portraits

Ugo Rondinone

Focus: Plasticine Figures of people

 

Year 2

Wassily Kandinsky

Focus: Concentric Circles

Alex Scheffler

Focus: Book Illustrations

Andy Goldsworthy

Focus: Natural Materials

 

 

Year 3

Georgia Totto O’Keeffe

Focus: Close Up Observations of Flowers

Stephen Wiltshire

Focus: Buildings

Toshiko Takaezu

Focus: Closed Clay Pots

 

Year 4

David Hockney

Focus: Landscapes

Maurits C Esher

Focus: Pattern

 

 

Emily Dickey

Focus: Landscapes

Year 5

Engonopoulos

Focus: Surrealism

Laura Carlin

Focus: Book Illustrations

Alberto Giacometti

Focus: Wire Armature and Modroc (Plaster of Paris) Figures

 

Year 6

Tyree Guyton

Focus: Urban Environmental Artist

The Heidelberg Project

Shen Zhou

Focus: Landscapes

 

Robert Diosneau

Focus: Emotions